Delta Society Australia is a national non-profit organisation.  We believe that the human-animal bond improves our quality of life and leaves lasting paw prints on our hearts.

 

There is a special kinship shared between dogs and people of all ages. Attention from a dog can brighten your day, make you feel loved and, as has been scientifically proven to improve overall health and well-being.

 

We believe that a better relationship between people and dogs will lead to a more enriched and fulfilled life for humans and dogs alike. 

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Dog Icon.png
Dog Icon.png
 

Our People

 

MELINDA FARRELL

Chief Executive Officer

ROBYN PAIKIN

RTO Operations &

Compliance Manager

DEBORAH RODRIGO

Media, Communications &

Engagement Specialist

KATE KYIET

National Program Manager

LILA TILLMAN

Course & Membership Coordinator

TRACEY JOHNS

National Office Administrator

ELIZABETH THOMPSON

Paws the Pressure Program Coordinator

ANGELA SHARPE

State Therapy Dogs Coordinator, Queensland

ANNE BOXHALL

Dog Safe Coordinator, Tasmania

CLAIRE CURTIS & JO COX

Joint Therapy Dogs Coordinators, Devonport

KYLA WALKER

State Therapy Dogs Coordinator,

ACT & New South Wales

To contact Program Coordinators across Australia, please visit us here.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

If people with COVID-19 are in the hospital or at clinics, aren’t I more likely to contract COVID-19 if I go to a hospital or clinic?


No. Hospitals and clinics are taking precautions to ensure patients are at no increased risk of contracting COVID-19 while there. Those with COVID-like symptoms are separated from other people. Sometimes they are seen in a tent in the parking lot or given an entirely separate entrance or part of the facility. Care teams are following best practices with personal protective equipment to protect themselves and others. When you visit a hospital or clinic you may be asked to wear a mask, be screen for symptoms, or have your temperature checked. Hospitals and clinics are also keeping patients not suspected of having COVID distanced from each other. Rooms and surfaces are given additional cleanings to ensure there is no transmission of the virus.




Are there alternative ways to get medical treatment?


Yes! Many hospitals and clinics are offering telemedicine consultations, allowing you to see a provider without leaving your home. Providers can write prescriptions and address many other health issues over a video chat. Call your local provider to ask if telemedicine options are available for you.




What’s the harm in waiting to see if my condition improves on its own?


Many conditions will worsen without treatment. Some can become life-threatening. Hospitals across the state have reported instances in which patients have even died because they didn’t seek the care they needed in a timely manner. Please don’t leave your health up to chance. If you have a health care concern, please contact your medical provider to discuss your symptoms or injury to determine the best next step for you. If you think you are experiencing symptoms of a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening illness, please seek care immediately.




This is a global pandemic. Aren’t hospitals too busy to care for me for something unrelated to COVID-19? Won’t I be a burden to them?


No! Your health care team wants to take care of you, regardless of what health issues you’re facing. In fact, hospitals are unusually quiet right now, with some needing to furlough employees due to lack of patients. They are eager to help you.




How can hospitals be unusually quiet right now?


When COVID-19 first struck, our state prepared for the worst, and we worried that our health care system could become overwhelmed. Through early social distancing and the cancellation of non-urgent procedures, Washington State’s health system was not overwhelmed. Even at the height of COVID, the health care system had capacity to care for chronic conditions and urgent health care needs. At the current time, we have capacity to serve a broader range of health care needs.




Where can I get more information?


Please see www.wsha.org/getcare for more information, or contact your local health care provider, clinic, or hospital.